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Many Pakistanis dig the cultural nods on 'Ms. Marvel' but are mixed on casting

Pakistanis weigh in on the new Disney+ show, which features the story of Kamala Khan, a Pakistani American teen who discovers her superpowers in her grandmother's bangle.

Many Pakistanis dig the cultural nods on 'Ms. Marvel' but are mixed on casting

Pakistanis weigh in on the new Disney+ show, which features the story of Kamala Khan, a Pakistani American teen who discovers her superpowers in her grandmother's bangle.


Developer of Pokemon Go Niantic Lays Off 8% of Staff - CNET

The software developer is cutting almost 100 jobs and cancelling four projects.

Developer of Pokemon Go Niantic Lays Off 8% of Staff - CNET

The software developer is cutting almost 100 jobs and cancelling four projects.


What if NASA actually finds life on Mars?

If there was life on Mars billions of years ago ? even just microbial life ? it could change our understanding of how life begins. Today, Mars is a wasteland. It?s a dusty desert, rough and pockmarked with craters. There?s no apparent life on its surface. But over the past decades, scientists have found evidence of a lost Mars, one that looked a lot more like Earth than like a hellhole.?You can see evidence of what Mars was like 4 billion years ago,? says NASA astrobiologist Lindsay Hays. Etched into its rocky surface, ?you see things like the remnants of a huge river delta,? she says. You see evidence of past lakes. That gets the imagination going. ?There may have been clouds in the atmosphere,? Hays says. ?The surface would have been absolutely beautiful.? Past missions to Mars ? including with robotic rovers, landers, and orbiters ? have added on-the-ground evidence that this watery past is very likely. And that?s the most exciting thing for an astrobiologist like Hays: Where there was water, there could have been life. ?One of the universal features that we see of life is that it needs water,? she says. There?s life that survives without light, life that survives without oxygen. Nothing that we know of lives without water. If there was water on the surface of ancient Mars, ?well, then maybe there was life that was living in that water,? she says. A recent episode of Unexplainable ? Vox?s podcast that explores big mysteries, unanswered questions, and all the things we learn by diving into the unknown ? is about the search for a key piece of evidence that would confirm if there was life on ancient Mars.Perseverance, NASA?s latest rover that landed on the Red Planet in 2021, is currently exploring an ancient dried-up river delta. The hope is that some form of microbial life that lived ? and died ? billions of years ago is preserved in its sediments. (It?s less likely that anything is currently alive on Mars.) The rover is on the hunt for rock samples that may eventually be returned to Earth for precise study; they would become the first Mars rocks returned to Earth by a scientific mission (we have some samples of Mars rocks that arrived on Earth via meteorite). But ... what if we find it? What if evidence of past life on Mars is confirmed? Finding life on Mars could help us understand how common life is in the universe?The reason that I am interested in the search for life has to do with this concept of how interrelated life is on Earth,? Hays explains.Any two human beings are related by a common ancestor if you look far enough back in their family trees. But the same is true of all life. There?s a common evolutionary ancestor relating a human to a chimpanzee, a chimpanzee to a frog, a frog to an insect, an insect to a spore of fungus. All life on Earth is related, via the last universal common ancestor (or LUCA), a hypothesized microbe that lived billions of years ago.To Hays, that relationship raises an epic question.?So, knowing that all life on this planet seems to be all related to each other, what would life on a different planet be like?? she asks. It?s possible, though not guaranteed, if Perseverance finds evidence of past life on Mars that scientists could determine if it likely shares a common ancestor with life on Earth. (?All life on Earth shares certain similarities,? she says, ?using DNA/RNA for ?information? storage and most of the same amino acids in their proteins. If we found life on Mars that shared those similarities,? then maybe it?s related to life on Earth. If life on Earth and Mars has a common ancestor, then that means possibly life started on one of the planets and then was somehow transported to the other (likely by meteorite). It?s possible that life didn?t start on Earth but instead on Mars, or perhaps even somewhere else in space.But if the Martian life seems very different from life on Earth, then it could mean that ?life is so fundamental a process of the universe that you can have two different life-generating events in the same solar system,? Hays says. That means life might be even more common in the universe than we currently suspect. Hays does caution that answers to these epic questions may still elude us, even with the best of all possible rock samples. Scientific evidence is often ambiguous, and there is sure to be debate about any sweeping conclusion.But the fact remains: Mars is a hugely important place in our solar system to investigate these questions.And there could be, right now, a simple rock lying on the Martian surface, with epic evidence inscribed in it. Maybe, just maybe, our robot rover will find that rock, collect it, and show us how special life really is. Further reading7 solar system mysteries scientists haven?t solved yet ? Why is our moon so weird? What killed Venus? Big cosmic questions lurk in our celestial backyard.NASA?s Perseverance mission, explainedApollo astronauts left their poop on the moon. We gotta go back for that shit.

What if NASA actually finds life on Mars?

If there was life on Mars billions of years ago ? even just microbial life ? it could change our understanding of how life begins. Today, Mars is a wasteland. It?s a dusty desert, rough and pockmarked with craters. There?s no apparent life on its surface. But over the past decades, scientists have found evidence of a lost Mars, one that looked a lot more like Earth than like a hellhole.?You can see evidence of what Mars was like 4 billion years ago,? says NASA astrobiologist Lindsay Hays. Etched into its rocky surface, ?you see things like the remnants of a huge river delta,? she says. You see evidence of past lakes. That gets the imagination going. ?There may have been clouds in the atmosphere,? Hays says. ?The surface would have been absolutely beautiful.? Past missions to Mars ? including with robotic rovers, landers, and orbiters ? have added on-the-ground evidence that this watery past is very likely. And that?s the most exciting thing for an astrobiologist like Hays: Where there was water, there could have been life. ?One of the universal features that we see of life is that it needs water,? she says. There?s life that survives without light, life that survives without oxygen. Nothing that we know of lives without water. If there was water on the surface of ancient Mars, ?well, then maybe there was life that was living in that water,? she says. A recent episode of Unexplainable ? Vox?s podcast that explores big mysteries, unanswered questions, and all the things we learn by diving into the unknown ? is about the search for a key piece of evidence that would confirm if there was life on ancient Mars.Perseverance, NASA?s latest rover that landed on the Red Planet in 2021, is currently exploring an ancient dried-up river delta. The hope is that some form of microbial life that lived ? and died ? billions of years ago is preserved in its sediments. (It?s less likely that anything is currently alive on Mars.) The rover is on the hunt for rock samples that may eventually be returned to Earth for precise study; they would become the first Mars rocks returned to Earth by a scientific mission (we have some samples of Mars rocks that arrived on Earth via meteorite). But ... what if we find it? What if evidence of past life on Mars is confirmed? Finding life on Mars could help us understand how common life is in the universe?The reason that I am interested in the search for life has to do with this concept of how interrelated life is on Earth,? Hays explains.Any two human beings are related by a common ancestor if you look far enough back in their family trees. But the same is true of all life. There?s a common evolutionary ancestor relating a human to a chimpanzee, a chimpanzee to a frog, a frog to an insect, an insect to a spore of fungus. All life on Earth is related, via the last universal common ancestor (or LUCA), a hypothesized microbe that lived billions of years ago.To Hays, that relationship raises an epic question.?So, knowing that all life on this planet seems to be all related to each other, what would life on a different planet be like?? she asks. It?s possible, though not guaranteed, if Perseverance finds evidence of past life on Mars that scientists could determine if it likely shares a common ancestor with life on Earth. (?All life on Earth shares certain similarities,? she says, ?using DNA/RNA for ?information? storage and most of the same amino acids in their proteins. If we found life on Mars that shared those similarities,? then maybe it?s related to life on Earth. If life on Earth and Mars has a common ancestor, then that means possibly life started on one of the planets and then was somehow transported to the other (likely by meteorite). It?s possible that life didn?t start on Earth but instead on Mars, or perhaps even somewhere else in space.But if the Martian life seems very different from life on Earth, then it could mean that ?life is so fundamental a process of the universe that you can have two different life-generating events in the same solar system,? Hays says. That means life might be even more common in the universe than we currently suspect. Hays does caution that answers to these epic questions may still elude us, even with the best of all possible rock samples. Scientific evidence is often ambiguous, and there is sure to be debate about any sweeping conclusion.But the fact remains: Mars is a hugely important place in our solar system to investigate these questions.And there could be, right now, a simple rock lying on the Martian surface, with epic evidence inscribed in it. Maybe, just maybe, our robot rover will find that rock, collect it, and show us how special life really is. Further reading7 solar system mysteries scientists haven?t solved yet ? Why is our moon so weird? What killed Venus? Big cosmic questions lurk in our celestial backyard.NASA?s Perseverance mission, explainedApollo astronauts left their poop on the moon. We gotta go back for that shit.


Who 'The Umbrella Academy' cast would trade their powers with

We sat down with the cast of The Umbrella Academy season 3 to find out who they would trade powers with and why.

Who 'The Umbrella Academy' cast would trade their powers with

We sat down with the cast of The Umbrella Academy season 3 to find out who they would trade powers with and why.


A new 'Players' clip from the episode 'Nightfall' hints at the softer side of Creamcheese

A still from the Paramount+ series,

The world of Players gets a little bit bigger in 'Nightfall,' the first season's sixth episode, which comes to Paramount+ on Thursday. While much of the esports team drama so far with Fugitive Gaming has focused primarily on the struggles between Organizm (Da'Jour Jones) and Creamcheese (Misha Brooks), the latest episode shifts the focus over to the Fugitive player named in its title.

Nightfall's (Youngbin Chung) history with the team and his strong connection to Creamcheese step into the spotlight as Players continues to paint an increasingly detailed picture of the journey that Fugitive was on before Org showed up, and how it's changed since the 17-year-old phenom's arrival.

This clip, which Paramount exclusively shared with Mashable, doesn't spoil the episode's surprises, but it does set the tone for what to expect. It's easy to root for Org as the soft-spoken underdog to Creamcheese's brashness and arrogance. Watching this clip, it's fair to wonder why Nightfall would so vehemently defend his longtime teammate. Those answers are coming soon.

New episodes of Players premiere every Thursday on Paramount+.

A new 'Players' clip from the episode 'Nightfall' hints at the softer side of Creamcheese

A still from the Paramount+ series,

The world of Players gets a little bit bigger in 'Nightfall,' the first season's sixth episode, which comes to Paramount+ on Thursday. While much of the esports team drama so far with Fugitive Gaming has focused primarily on the struggles between Organizm (Da'Jour Jones) and Creamcheese (Misha Brooks), the latest episode shifts the focus over to the Fugitive player named in its title.

Nightfall's (Youngbin Chung) history with the team and his strong connection to Creamcheese step into the spotlight as Players continues to paint an increasingly detailed picture of the journey that Fugitive was on before Org showed up, and how it's changed since the 17-year-old phenom's arrival.

This clip, which Paramount exclusively shared with Mashable, doesn't spoil the episode's surprises, but it does set the tone for what to expect. It's easy to root for Org as the soft-spoken underdog to Creamcheese's brashness and arrogance. Watching this clip, it's fair to wonder why Nightfall would so vehemently defend his longtime teammate. Those answers are coming soon.

New episodes of Players premiere every Thursday on Paramount+.


Best Vlogging Camera for 2022 - CNET

Whether you're just shooting for fun or you're aiming for YouTube glory, this is the gear you need to make your videos shine.

Best Vlogging Camera for 2022 - CNET

Whether you're just shooting for fun or you're aiming for YouTube glory, this is the gear you need to make your videos shine.


The best travel sites to help you plan the perfect trip

Traveling can be a great way to log off, relax, and recuperate from the stress of everyday life.But planning your next travel adventure? That can be a downright existential hellscape, a task that can quickly turn from exciting to tedious as you try to juggle various destinations, figure out the best time to travel, how to find the best deals, and what to do when you actually get there. And that's just the basics. Factoring in canceled flights and the hoops you need to go through to travel in our current day, the idea of traveling can eventually inspire a dull but persistent sense of dread. SEE ALSO: 10 gift ideas for that friend who loves to travel Fortunately, that's where the internet comes in. There are a variety of websites and apps designed to take the stress out of traveling and make sure that planning your next trip is as fun and easy as possible. For example, apps like HotelTonight, which will help you find cheap hotel rooms on extremely short notice, and SitOrSquat, which will direct you to nearby restrooms while you're already on the road, should be a part of the essential toolkit for any travelers.So whether you're you're looking for travel inspiration, trying to find plane tickets on the cheap, or looking for ways to make your life easier once you're on the ground at your next destination, here are the best apps and sites for travelers.If you're looking for travel inspiration:Instagram

The best travel sites to help you plan the perfect trip

Traveling can be a great way to log off, relax, and recuperate from the stress of everyday life.But planning your next travel adventure? That can be a downright existential hellscape, a task that can quickly turn from exciting to tedious as you try to juggle various destinations, figure out the best time to travel, how to find the best deals, and what to do when you actually get there. And that's just the basics. Factoring in canceled flights and the hoops you need to go through to travel in our current day, the idea of traveling can eventually inspire a dull but persistent sense of dread. SEE ALSO: 10 gift ideas for that friend who loves to travel Fortunately, that's where the internet comes in. There are a variety of websites and apps designed to take the stress out of traveling and make sure that planning your next trip is as fun and easy as possible. For example, apps like HotelTonight, which will help you find cheap hotel rooms on extremely short notice, and SitOrSquat, which will direct you to nearby restrooms while you're already on the road, should be a part of the essential toolkit for any travelers.So whether you're you're looking for travel inspiration, trying to find plane tickets on the cheap, or looking for ways to make your life easier once you're on the ground at your next destination, here are the best apps and sites for travelers.If you're looking for travel inspiration:Instagram


Was Tuesday’s testimony a political breaking point for Trump?

Or just another chance to rise from the ashes? The political world is still collecting itself following the testimony of former White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson on Tuesday to the committee investigating the January 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol. The sheer volume of shocking details she provided, about what then-President Donald Trump knew in advance of the Capitol riot and his behavior that day, is such that it will take a while to assess its impacts. Among the obvious questions, though, is just how bad this will be for Trump, politically, and how Republicans will react to it.In conversations with a half-dozen Republican strategists who represent a spectrum of opinion within the party and were granted anonymity to speak frankly, there was a broad consensus that, yes, this might have an impact on Trump ? but probably not on Republicans in the midterms. There was a sense that this would inflict real damage on Trump?s long-term ambitions, even if it did nothing to shift the needle for now.?What more do you need to believe crimes were committed?? one Republican strategist asked, before also conceding that ?There have been a million times when people say Trump is finished, but this could be the millionth and one, but I don?t see a way for him to come back from this testimony.?Another Republican operative noted that Hutchinson?s testimony has the potential to make a big impact because of her rarefied level of access to the president, and compared her to Miles Taylor, the former Trump DHS official who wrote an anonymous op-ed for the New York Times in 2018. That operative said while Taylor had ?The operative told me,? ?This is someone who legit had tremendous daily access ... not some nobody trying to make a name for herself like Miles Taylor. This is a real person who was taken seriously.?Further, Trump has less goodwill among the political class inside the GOP than he did in the past. As one national strategist pointed out, there are ?a lot of people that feel burned by Trump this cycle because he?s getting involved in so many different primaries. There are a lot of Republican consultants who were loyal and our candidates were loyal, and he picked somebody else, so it?s all interconnected.? The national strategist added that they ?didn?t know where the breaking point is. I felt like it was after January 6, but it didn?t last as long. Every time you second-guess the guy, he rises like the phoenix from the ashes, but there is a breaking point.?As to where that breaking point was, the Republican operative noted the silence from most national Republicans. ?It?s fascinating how little you?re hearing from people like Ron DeSantis,? they said, and marveled at ?how few members of Congress have stepped in? to defend Trump since Hutchinson?s testimony.Even if Tuesday?s revelations further dent Trump?s potential to mount a political comeback, don?t expect Republicans to publicly say so. ?There still is a tribal industrial complex that won?t let people go out and speak against this president,? the strategist said.Not all agreed. The Republican strategist who was, of all those Vox spoke to, the most dubious of the hearing?s impact simply thought anything Hutchinson said was discredited by what they considered a tainted and partisan process. ?The persuasive potential of the committee died when [Speaker Nancy] Pelosi threw [Republican Rep.] Jim Banks off, and not just [Republican Rep.] Jim Jordan. ... At that point, it was clear Nancy wanted a partisan show trial, not an investigation. So Republicans checked out.?The skeptical Republican added, ?Look, Soviet show trials sometimes turned up evidence of real shit, but we don?t take them seriously because it was mixed in with a huge amount of theatrics. Cassidy Hutchinson will be seen the same way, both because her story about grabbing the wheel is unraveling, and because she?s testifying in a ludicrous forum.? (Anonymous pushback to one of the most explosive parts of Hutchinson?s testimony appeared in reports shortly after it, when Secret Service sources disputed to several outlets that Trump ever tried to grab the steering wheel of the presidential SUV to go directly to the Capitol on January 6 and assaulted an agent in the process. Hutchinson never claimed to have witnessed that event, simply that that story was relayed to her shortly after it took place by deputy chief of staff Tony Ornato.)Whatever the impact on Trump, none of the Republicans I spoke to thought the testimony would damage Republicans in the midterms. As one veteran operative pointed out, ?people right now are really focused on $5 to $6 a gallon gas and I think that?s where people?s heads are at. By and large people have tuned this out. ... Maybe this would be different if the economy was better but people are focused on their own welfare right now.?That was echoed by another Republican working on 2022 races, who said, ?No one is going to vote based on something that is happening within Washington regarding something that occurred a year and a half ago.?

Was Tuesday’s testimony a political breaking point for Trump?

Or just another chance to rise from the ashes? The political world is still collecting itself following the testimony of former White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson on Tuesday to the committee investigating the January 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol. The sheer volume of shocking details she provided, about what then-President Donald Trump knew in advance of the Capitol riot and his behavior that day, is such that it will take a while to assess its impacts. Among the obvious questions, though, is just how bad this will be for Trump, politically, and how Republicans will react to it.In conversations with a half-dozen Republican strategists who represent a spectrum of opinion within the party and were granted anonymity to speak frankly, there was a broad consensus that, yes, this might have an impact on Trump ? but probably not on Republicans in the midterms. There was a sense that this would inflict real damage on Trump?s long-term ambitions, even if it did nothing to shift the needle for now.?What more do you need to believe crimes were committed?? one Republican strategist asked, before also conceding that ?There have been a million times when people say Trump is finished, but this could be the millionth and one, but I don?t see a way for him to come back from this testimony.?Another Republican operative noted that Hutchinson?s testimony has the potential to make a big impact because of her rarefied level of access to the president, and compared her to Miles Taylor, the former Trump DHS official who wrote an anonymous op-ed for the New York Times in 2018. That operative said while Taylor had ?The operative told me,? ?This is someone who legit had tremendous daily access ... not some nobody trying to make a name for herself like Miles Taylor. This is a real person who was taken seriously.?Further, Trump has less goodwill among the political class inside the GOP than he did in the past. As one national strategist pointed out, there are ?a lot of people that feel burned by Trump this cycle because he?s getting involved in so many different primaries. There are a lot of Republican consultants who were loyal and our candidates were loyal, and he picked somebody else, so it?s all interconnected.? The national strategist added that they ?didn?t know where the breaking point is. I felt like it was after January 6, but it didn?t last as long. Every time you second-guess the guy, he rises like the phoenix from the ashes, but there is a breaking point.?As to where that breaking point was, the Republican operative noted the silence from most national Republicans. ?It?s fascinating how little you?re hearing from people like Ron DeSantis,? they said, and marveled at ?how few members of Congress have stepped in? to defend Trump since Hutchinson?s testimony.Even if Tuesday?s revelations further dent Trump?s potential to mount a political comeback, don?t expect Republicans to publicly say so. ?There still is a tribal industrial complex that won?t let people go out and speak against this president,? the strategist said.Not all agreed. The Republican strategist who was, of all those Vox spoke to, the most dubious of the hearing?s impact simply thought anything Hutchinson said was discredited by what they considered a tainted and partisan process. ?The persuasive potential of the committee died when [Speaker Nancy] Pelosi threw [Republican Rep.] Jim Banks off, and not just [Republican Rep.] Jim Jordan. ... At that point, it was clear Nancy wanted a partisan show trial, not an investigation. So Republicans checked out.?The skeptical Republican added, ?Look, Soviet show trials sometimes turned up evidence of real shit, but we don?t take them seriously because it was mixed in with a huge amount of theatrics. Cassidy Hutchinson will be seen the same way, both because her story about grabbing the wheel is unraveling, and because she?s testifying in a ludicrous forum.? (Anonymous pushback to one of the most explosive parts of Hutchinson?s testimony appeared in reports shortly after it, when Secret Service sources disputed to several outlets that Trump ever tried to grab the steering wheel of the presidential SUV to go directly to the Capitol on January 6 and assaulted an agent in the process. Hutchinson never claimed to have witnessed that event, simply that that story was relayed to her shortly after it took place by deputy chief of staff Tony Ornato.)Whatever the impact on Trump, none of the Republicans I spoke to thought the testimony would damage Republicans in the midterms. As one veteran operative pointed out, ?people right now are really focused on $5 to $6 a gallon gas and I think that?s where people?s heads are at. By and large people have tuned this out. ... Maybe this would be different if the economy was better but people are focused on their own welfare right now.?That was echoed by another Republican working on 2022 races, who said, ?No one is going to vote based on something that is happening within Washington regarding something that occurred a year and a half ago.?


A Yellowstone visitor was injured when he got too close to a bison

A Colorado man who Yellowstone National Park officials say got too close to a bison was thrown by the animal while trying to get himself and a child away from danger.

A Yellowstone visitor was injured when he got too close to a bison

A Colorado man who Yellowstone National Park officials say got too close to a bison was thrown by the animal while trying to get himself and a child away from danger.


All Clear: 'Risky Asteroid' Will Miss Earth in 2052 - CNET

Asteroid 2021 MQ1 has been removed from a risk list.

All Clear: 'Risky Asteroid' Will Miss Earth in 2052 - CNET

Asteroid 2021 MQ1 has been removed from a risk list.


What people are Googling in states where abortion is now illegal

Google searches show people?s questions and fears in a post-Roe America. When the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade last Friday, many Americans were upset and confused ? and they turned to the internet for answers. The 6-3 decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women?s Health immediately made abortion illegal in eight states, and it will likely become so in nearly half of all states soon. It?s a move that runs counter to what the vast majority of Americans want ? 85 percent think abortion should be legal in some or all instances ? and it will have far-reaching consequences on everything from the health and economic status of women to the well-being of their existing children. To get an understanding of what?s on Americans? minds after this historic ruling, we asked Google for the top trending questions people posed to the search engine since June 24, both in the states where abortion first became illegal following the Dobbs decision and nationally. (Trending searches show where there?s the greatest increase in searches, not the highest volume, and are a good way to sort out perennial searches from new ones.) What Americans asked sheds light on their anxieties and where the discussion may go next.In individual states where abortion became illegal (though the bans have since been challenged in court in several of those states), the questions often involved where exactly the procedure is legal or illegal and where else people could get an abortion. In Louisiana, the No. 1 trending search question was about whether abortion was legal in Florida. In Arkansas, people asked about Texas. In Kentucky, Missouri, and South Dakota, several of the top questions people Googled were related to abortion pills ? if they?re illegal, how they work, and for how long they?re effective. As Vox?s Rachel Cohen pointed out, crossing state lines to have an abortion or having health care providers mail pills to people in states where abortion is illegal presents thorny and unanswered legal questions.Many others in states where abortion is illegal were confused about what the abortion ban meant when abortion is medically necessary. They asked if aborting an ectopic pregnancy, a life-threatening complication in which a fertilized egg implants outside the uterus, was banned (most states with abortion bans have exceptions when the life of the mother is at risk, but the decision could put doctors and patients in a tough situation). They also wondered if having a miscarriage, where the fetus needs to be removed, is considered an abortion (it?s a gray area, and the ruling could certainly make doctors more hesitant). People in Arkansas and Louisiana asked if the Bible talks about abortion (it?s not explicit). Those in Utah and Alabama wanted to know why abortion is illegal.On a national level, the trending Google search questions about abortion this last week were somewhat broader: How many abortions were performed in 2021? What does abortion mean? What percentage of abortions are medically necessary?Importantly, people across the country made it clear their concerns about the Supreme Court decision were about more than just abortion. The No. 2 trending abortion question: What does Roe v. Wade protect besides abortion? People also wanted to know if Roe v. Wade would affect IVF, LGBTQ rights, and interracial relationships. Google

What people are Googling in states where abortion is now illegal

Google searches show people?s questions and fears in a post-Roe America. When the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade last Friday, many Americans were upset and confused ? and they turned to the internet for answers. The 6-3 decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women?s Health immediately made abortion illegal in eight states, and it will likely become so in nearly half of all states soon. It?s a move that runs counter to what the vast majority of Americans want ? 85 percent think abortion should be legal in some or all instances ? and it will have far-reaching consequences on everything from the health and economic status of women to the well-being of their existing children. To get an understanding of what?s on Americans? minds after this historic ruling, we asked Google for the top trending questions people posed to the search engine since June 24, both in the states where abortion first became illegal following the Dobbs decision and nationally. (Trending searches show where there?s the greatest increase in searches, not the highest volume, and are a good way to sort out perennial searches from new ones.) What Americans asked sheds light on their anxieties and where the discussion may go next.In individual states where abortion became illegal (though the bans have since been challenged in court in several of those states), the questions often involved where exactly the procedure is legal or illegal and where else people could get an abortion. In Louisiana, the No. 1 trending search question was about whether abortion was legal in Florida. In Arkansas, people asked about Texas. In Kentucky, Missouri, and South Dakota, several of the top questions people Googled were related to abortion pills ? if they?re illegal, how they work, and for how long they?re effective. As Vox?s Rachel Cohen pointed out, crossing state lines to have an abortion or having health care providers mail pills to people in states where abortion is illegal presents thorny and unanswered legal questions.Many others in states where abortion is illegal were confused about what the abortion ban meant when abortion is medically necessary. They asked if aborting an ectopic pregnancy, a life-threatening complication in which a fertilized egg implants outside the uterus, was banned (most states with abortion bans have exceptions when the life of the mother is at risk, but the decision could put doctors and patients in a tough situation). They also wondered if having a miscarriage, where the fetus needs to be removed, is considered an abortion (it?s a gray area, and the ruling could certainly make doctors more hesitant). People in Arkansas and Louisiana asked if the Bible talks about abortion (it?s not explicit). Those in Utah and Alabama wanted to know why abortion is illegal.On a national level, the trending Google search questions about abortion this last week were somewhat broader: How many abortions were performed in 2021? What does abortion mean? What percentage of abortions are medically necessary?Importantly, people across the country made it clear their concerns about the Supreme Court decision were about more than just abortion. The No. 2 trending abortion question: What does Roe v. Wade protect besides abortion? People also wanted to know if Roe v. Wade would affect IVF, LGBTQ rights, and interracial relationships. Google


20 men are convicted in the 2015 Paris terror attacks; one sentenced to life in prison

The deadliest peacetime attacks in French history killed 130 people. Chief suspect Salah Abdeslam was found guilty of murder and attempted murder in relation to a terrorist enterprise.

20 men are convicted in the 2015 Paris terror attacks; one sentenced to life in prison

The deadliest peacetime attacks in French history killed 130 people. Chief suspect Salah Abdeslam was found guilty of murder and attempted murder in relation to a terrorist enterprise.


Pelosi receives Communion in the Vatican, despite her home archbishop refusing it

The head of the church in San Francisco has said the House Speaker can't receive the sacrament there because of her abortion rights support, but Pope Francis has avoided politicizing the Eucharist.

Pelosi receives Communion in the Vatican, despite her home archbishop refusing it

The head of the church in San Francisco has said the House Speaker can't receive the sacrament there because of her abortion rights support, but Pope Francis has avoided politicizing the Eucharist.


The best luggage deals ahead of Prime Day 2022: Shop before your summer vacation

Our picks for the best luggage deals ahead of Prime Day 2022:BEST LUGGAGE SET DEAL: The American Tourister Fieldbrook XLT 4-Piece Set

The best luggage deals ahead of Prime Day 2022: Shop before your summer vacation

Our picks for the best luggage deals ahead of Prime Day 2022:BEST LUGGAGE SET DEAL: The American Tourister Fieldbrook XLT 4-Piece Set


Wondering Why Gmail Looks Different? New Design Rolls Out by Default - CNET

Some people will start seeing the new Gmail interface by default.

Wondering Why Gmail Looks Different? New Design Rolls Out by Default - CNET

Some people will start seeing the new Gmail interface by default.


1,100-HP Red Bull RB17 Hybrid Hypercar Coming in 2025 for $6M - CNET

Red Bull's first stand-alone road car will be developed by Adrian Newey, who worked on the Aston Martin Valkyrie.

1,100-HP Red Bull RB17 Hybrid Hypercar Coming in 2025 for $6M - CNET

Red Bull's first stand-alone road car will be developed by Adrian Newey, who worked on the Aston Martin Valkyrie.



Anyone can fall for online scams — even you. Here’s how to avoid them.

From spam texts to payment app fraud to crypto tricks. Alison Giordano just wanted to help out a friend, but instead, she almost lost her Instagram account.The scam was pretty sneaky: A friend messaged Giordano (who, full disclosure, is a friend of mine) on Instagram asking if she could help her win a contest. The friend would send her a text with a link, and all Giordano had to do was take a screenshot of the text and send it back to her friend. Giordano did as instructed. Moments later, she got an email from Instagram saying someone logged into her account from a different location on a different device.A screenshot that causes your account to be hacked sounds like a lower-stakes but higher-tech version of The Ring, but what happened to Giordano is actually quite simple. There was no contest, and the text didn?t come from her friend. Giordano?s friend (or, almost certainly, someone who took over her friend?s account and was pretending to be her friend) went to Instagram?s password reset page and requested a reset link for Giordano?s account. That prompted Instagram to send a text to Giordano with a link to access her Instagram account. The URL of the link was in the text, so when Giordano took the screenshot and sent it back, the scammer simply entered the URL in their device, and that let them access Giordano?s account ? no password or supernatural curses necessary.Fortunately for Giordano, she saw Instagram?s email almost immediately and was able to get back into her account before the scammer took it over. She blocked her friend?s account, changed her password, and enabled two-factor authentication.?I was just very naive and trusting,? Giordano tells me. ?I felt pretty stupid when all was said and done.? She shouldn?t have. The Instagram messages came from what appeared to be a friend, and Giordano?s other friends have asked for her help with (real) social media-based contests in the past, so of course she didn?t think much of it. She certainly didn?t think sending a screenshot could compromise her account. Until we spoke, she didn?t even know how it happened ? it took me a while to figure it out too, until this tweet warning about this kind of scam clarified things. If Giordano hadn?t seen that email from Instagram, her account might have been lost to her forever, probably going on to try to scam all of her friends.We?d like to think that scams happen to other people who aren?t as smart or savvy as we are. Many people who get scammed believe this, which is why the vast majority of them will never report it: Either they don?t know they were scammed or they?re ashamed to admit that it happened to them.But it could happen to anyone, including you.?The reason why these scams work is because some of them are good,? Yael Grauer, content lead for Consumer Reports? Security Planner, tells Vox. ?Even though I think education is important, there?s a reason social engineering is a thing. You can?t be perfect and on guard all the time.?Scammers prey on our biggest fears and strongest desires. They get better all the time, so it?s worth your time to learn how to recognize their tactics. The mediums scammers use may change, but many of the underlying strategies stay the same ? which means the recommendations for how to protect yourself from them do too.Don?t panic ...When I got an email saying there was a new login to my Twitter account from Moscow, my initial response was abject terror (My checkmark! My DMs! My reputation!). At first glance, the email looked a lot like the login confirmation emails that Twitter actually sends. Even the email address it was sent from was very close to the one Twitter uses for such notifications. I admit that I almost clicked on the account restoration link. Then the adrenaline wore off, and I realized that the email came from ?twitter-act.com? and not ?twitter.com.? It was sent to my work email, which isn?t attached to my Twitter account, and it had a typo. Most importantly, I remembered that some of my co-workers had gotten similar phishing emails only a few days before. I actually knew to expect this one, but all of that fell out of my head for a few seconds ? which was exactly the point.?It?s really, really hard for us to access logical thinking when we?re in a heightened emotional state, and it?s so hard to get out of that state once you?ve engaged,? says Kathy Stokes, director of fraud prevention at the AARP. ?If you feel an immediate sort of visceral, emotional reaction to something coming your way, try to let that be your red flag.?Scammers know that emotions make their job easier. People get careless or let their guard down, which is why so many scams start with urgent messages asking you to do something immediately: dispute an erroneous charge on your Amazon account, fix your hacked social media account, avoid being arrested by the IRS police by settling a bill that for some reason can only be paid off in gift cards. In almost every case, a legitimate message doesn?t need you to respond within the next 30 seconds. So take that 30 seconds to calm down and think before you click anything.? and don?t engageIf you get a message or call you weren?t expecting and don?t know, the best thing to do is ignore it. Even what appears to be a perfectly innocent wrong number text could be something more insidious: someone trying to scam you by starting up a conversation. I?ve gotten a few of those wrong number texts, and while I?d like to think they kept texting me back because of my sparkling wit and impeccable conversation skills, that almost certainly wasn?t the reason.?Someone texts something important enough for you to tell them it?s a wrong number and suddenly they?re like, ?You sound like a great person,?? Grauer says. ?For the most part, it?s almost always a scam.? Find your meet-cute somewhere else.That?s especially true for the texts and calls you know are scams. You may think it?ll be cathartic to respond to those by cursing out the people who are trying to steal your money, but the best thing you can do is block the number and move on with your life. Engaging with a scammer tells them your phone number or email address has a real person on the other end of it, which will only set you up to get more texts and calls and emails.?The basic rule of thumb is simply hang up, and call whatever enterprise you think called you directly,? Alex Quilici, CEO of robocall-blocking software company YouMail, explains. For example, if your ?bank? calls, you should hang up, find the number of your bank on your debit card (or another official source, like its website), and call that number back. ?That?s the 100 percent safe way to deal with the issue.?Even better is stopping scam calls and texts from reaching you at all. Phone companies now offer free spam-blocking services, which can identify and stop potential scam or spam calls. Some services can block potential spam texts: iOS devices have built-in text filters, and Google?s Messages app can warn you if a text seems suspicious.Don?t give out your passwordThis should be obvious by now, right? Clearly not, since it?s believed that 90 percent of cyberattacks are the result of successful phishing schemes, where a hacker or scammer tricks victims into thinking they?re a trusted or known source to give their sensitive information to. Some are better than others. I?ve seen some knowledgeable people in my own life fall for email-from-your-employer attacks (they clicked the links, but I hope they all stopped short of giving out their passwords). That?s why most businesses will tell you that they will never ask for your password, and authentication texts will usually say something like ?[Company] will never ask you for this code.? Also, you should really stop using two-factor authentication with texts, which are much less secure ? use an authenticator app instead. Google makes a popular one for both iOS and Android. Scammers love to use social media to find victims, too. If you?ve ever so much as tweeted the word ?hack,? you?ll get a series of what I like to call Twitter Scam Reply Guys, who will usually recommend that you contact someone they claim to know who can get your account back, as long as you give them your login credentials and/or pay them (don?t do this).Know where links are taking youA common way people get hacked or scammed is through malicious links, often in their email, texts, or DMs. Always check where a link is taking you before you click on it, and only go to websites you trust. That?s easier said than done, of course; it can be hard to see where a link is directing you on a smaller mobile device, and shortened link services may make it impossible to know where you?ll end up. If you get a text from FedEx about a package delivery with a link, for example, you may not realize that the website it?s sending you to isn?t FedEx.The best thing to do is go to a company?s website directly, rather than through a random link in a text you weren?t expecting in the first place. If you get a text that claims to be FedEx or Wells Fargo, go to FedEx.com or WellsFargo.com; don?t click the link on the text. And definitely don?t enter any of your sensitive information ? like your credit card, social security number, or your password ? on a site if you aren?t absolutely sure that it?s the site you think it is.Be very careful with payment appsOverpayment scams ? when someone sends you more money than you were expecting and then asks you to give them back the difference ? have stood the test of time. Once it was paper checks and wire transfers. Payment apps have made it even easier.In fact, peer-to-peer payment apps like Venmo, Zelle, and Cash App have made a lot of scams easier because it?s fairly seamless to send money through them, and those transfers are instantaneous. There?s a reason why those apps tell you over and over again to be sure that the person you?re sending money to is who you think they are: Once your money is sent, you often can?t get it back. These services don?t have the same protections as, say, a credit card or, in some cases, PayPal. One example of how scammers exploit these apps (and human decency) is to send money to random accounts (like yours), then claim they sent it to the wrong person and ask you to please send the money back. Being nice, you send the money back, only to later discover that the money that was sent to you came from a stolen credit card. Now you have to pay it back ? all of it.If you?re the recipient of extra or unexpected funds, don?t just send the money back to wherever it came from, even if the sender gives you a convincing sob story for why you should. The best thing to do is contact the payment app and deal with the matter through them, rather than directly with whoever sent you the money.There are ways to protect yourself to a certain extent on these apps. Most will give you a way to verify that you?re sending money to the right person by confirming their email address or phone number first. Use these safeguards. Consumer Reports suggests connecting your peer-to-peer payment apps to a credit card instead of a bank account, as credit cards have more protections for fraudulent transactions. If the app won?t protect you, your credit card company might, though most payment apps make you pay a 3 percent fee on credit card transactions.It?s also a good idea to put a PIN code on those apps, so even if someone gets into your phone ? say, if they ask to borrow it to make an emergency call ? they can?t get into your apps and send your money away. This will add an extra step to using your payment app, but an easily remembered four-digit PIN takes about a second to enter and could save you a lot of money. Don?t use cryptoEven in the best of circumstances, crypto is a loosely (or barely) regulated market that?s as volatile as it is hard to understand. That has helped make it a prime target for scammers and hackers. The decentralized aspect of crypto may be part of its appeal, but it?s a lot less appealing when you check your wallet one day and discover all your apes are gone. Maybe you?ll get lucky and OpenSea will freeze trading of your stolen NFT in time, or Coinbase will reimburse you if your crypto was stolen through its own security flaw. But don?t count on it.?The advice I give people is that if you don?t understand how it works, don?t get involved in it,? Sean Gallagher, a senior threat researcher at Sophos, says. ?Considering that many people who consider themselves educated about crypto still manage to get scammed, it?s probably not a good idea for most people to get into cryptocurrency investing.?While crypto is relatively new, many people are getting scammed through some of the oldest tricks in the book. Stokes, of the AARP, says she has seen ?a ton? of scams where someone gains a victim?s trust and claims they can help invest their money in crypto for a big return. The Federal Trade Commission recently reported that consumers lost $1 billion to crypto-based fraud between January 2021 and March 2022, with most of those losses coming from bogus investment scams ? and most of those came from social media posts or ads. And those are just the losses people told the FTC about; again, most people don?t report being defrauded. These days, it?s easy enough to lose money in ?legitimate? crypto investments. Why make it even riskier?Protect yourself from yourselfOne way to avoid getting scammed is to preemptively protect your accounts from your mistakes as much as possible. If Giordano had two-factor authentication on her Instagram account, the scammers wouldn?t have been able to get into it through the URL ? they?d need the code from her authenticator, too. There are a few ways you can protect your accounts from getting hacked, including setting up two-factor authentication and using different passwords for everything via a password manager. You can lock things down even more by using hardware authenticators and anti-malware software, which you can get for mobile devices too.?That?s what security software is supposed to do,? Mark Ostrowski, head of engineering at cybersecurity company Check Point, says. It should protect you from ?a lapse in judgment or if the scam is really, really, really, really good.?At a certain point, your security measures might feel like more trouble than they?re worth. I have to admit, things were easier when I didn?t have to juggle my password manager, two different authenticator apps, and text messages for the accounts where authenticator apps aren?t available. But I?d rather have to take an extra step to log into an account than go through getting hacked and (temporarily) losing $13,000, like I did that time hackers got into my bank account. You never know who has your password or how they got it.?There?s an ongoing usability versus security thing where it?s not fun, it?s time-consuming, it?s annoying,? Grauer, of Consumer Reports, says. It?s up to you to decide where the balance between usability and security should be, keeping in mind what you would lose if someone took over your accounts. After that, all you can do is try to keep these tips in mind, hope for the best, and don?t be too hard on yourself if you fall victim to the worst.?Having a healthy paranoia, I think, is important,? Ostrowski says, before confessing that even he has slipped up and clicked on a few links he shouldn?t have. ?I hate to admit it, but I think everybody has, right??

Anyone can fall for online scams — even you. Here’s how to avoid them.

From spam texts to payment app fraud to crypto tricks. Alison Giordano just wanted to help out a friend, but instead, she almost lost her Instagram account.The scam was pretty sneaky: A friend messaged Giordano (who, full disclosure, is a friend of mine) on Instagram asking if she could help her win a contest. The friend would send her a text with a link, and all Giordano had to do was take a screenshot of the text and send it back to her friend. Giordano did as instructed. Moments later, she got an email from Instagram saying someone logged into her account from a different location on a different device.A screenshot that causes your account to be hacked sounds like a lower-stakes but higher-tech version of The Ring, but what happened to Giordano is actually quite simple. There was no contest, and the text didn?t come from her friend. Giordano?s friend (or, almost certainly, someone who took over her friend?s account and was pretending to be her friend) went to Instagram?s password reset page and requested a reset link for Giordano?s account. That prompted Instagram to send a text to Giordano with a link to access her Instagram account. The URL of the link was in the text, so when Giordano took the screenshot and sent it back, the scammer simply entered the URL in their device, and that let them access Giordano?s account ? no password or supernatural curses necessary.Fortunately for Giordano, she saw Instagram?s email almost immediately and was able to get back into her account before the scammer took it over. She blocked her friend?s account, changed her password, and enabled two-factor authentication.?I was just very naive and trusting,? Giordano tells me. ?I felt pretty stupid when all was said and done.? She shouldn?t have. The Instagram messages came from what appeared to be a friend, and Giordano?s other friends have asked for her help with (real) social media-based contests in the past, so of course she didn?t think much of it. She certainly didn?t think sending a screenshot could compromise her account. Until we spoke, she didn?t even know how it happened ? it took me a while to figure it out too, until this tweet warning about this kind of scam clarified things. If Giordano hadn?t seen that email from Instagram, her account might have been lost to her forever, probably going on to try to scam all of her friends.We?d like to think that scams happen to other people who aren?t as smart or savvy as we are. Many people who get scammed believe this, which is why the vast majority of them will never report it: Either they don?t know they were scammed or they?re ashamed to admit that it happened to them.But it could happen to anyone, including you.?The reason why these scams work is because some of them are good,? Yael Grauer, content lead for Consumer Reports? Security Planner, tells Vox. ?Even though I think education is important, there?s a reason social engineering is a thing. You can?t be perfect and on guard all the time.?Scammers prey on our biggest fears and strongest desires. They get better all the time, so it?s worth your time to learn how to recognize their tactics. The mediums scammers use may change, but many of the underlying strategies stay the same ? which means the recommendations for how to protect yourself from them do too.Don?t panic ...When I got an email saying there was a new login to my Twitter account from Moscow, my initial response was abject terror (My checkmark! My DMs! My reputation!). At first glance, the email looked a lot like the login confirmation emails that Twitter actually sends. Even the email address it was sent from was very close to the one Twitter uses for such notifications. I admit that I almost clicked on the account restoration link. Then the adrenaline wore off, and I realized that the email came from ?twitter-act.com? and not ?twitter.com.? It was sent to my work email, which isn?t attached to my Twitter account, and it had a typo. Most importantly, I remembered that some of my co-workers had gotten similar phishing emails only a few days before. I actually knew to expect this one, but all of that fell out of my head for a few seconds ? which was exactly the point.?It?s really, really hard for us to access logical thinking when we?re in a heightened emotional state, and it?s so hard to get out of that state once you?ve engaged,? says Kathy Stokes, director of fraud prevention at the AARP. ?If you feel an immediate sort of visceral, emotional reaction to something coming your way, try to let that be your red flag.?Scammers know that emotions make their job easier. People get careless or let their guard down, which is why so many scams start with urgent messages asking you to do something immediately: dispute an erroneous charge on your Amazon account, fix your hacked social media account, avoid being arrested by the IRS police by settling a bill that for some reason can only be paid off in gift cards. In almost every case, a legitimate message doesn?t need you to respond within the next 30 seconds. So take that 30 seconds to calm down and think before you click anything.? and don?t engageIf you get a message or call you weren?t expecting and don?t know, the best thing to do is ignore it. Even what appears to be a perfectly innocent wrong number text could be something more insidious: someone trying to scam you by starting up a conversation. I?ve gotten a few of those wrong number texts, and while I?d like to think they kept texting me back because of my sparkling wit and impeccable conversation skills, that almost certainly wasn?t the reason.?Someone texts something important enough for you to tell them it?s a wrong number and suddenly they?re like, ?You sound like a great person,?? Grauer says. ?For the most part, it?s almost always a scam.? Find your meet-cute somewhere else.That?s especially true for the texts and calls you know are scams. You may think it?ll be cathartic to respond to those by cursing out the people who are trying to steal your money, but the best thing you can do is block the number and move on with your life. Engaging with a scammer tells them your phone number or email address has a real person on the other end of it, which will only set you up to get more texts and calls and emails.?The basic rule of thumb is simply hang up, and call whatever enterprise you think called you directly,? Alex Quilici, CEO of robocall-blocking software company YouMail, explains. For example, if your ?bank? calls, you should hang up, find the number of your bank on your debit card (or another official source, like its website), and call that number back. ?That?s the 100 percent safe way to deal with the issue.?Even better is stopping scam calls and texts from reaching you at all. Phone companies now offer free spam-blocking services, which can identify and stop potential scam or spam calls. Some services can block potential spam texts: iOS devices have built-in text filters, and Google?s Messages app can warn you if a text seems suspicious.Don?t give out your passwordThis should be obvious by now, right? Clearly not, since it?s believed that 90 percent of cyberattacks are the result of successful phishing schemes, where a hacker or scammer tricks victims into thinking they?re a trusted or known source to give their sensitive information to. Some are better than others. I?ve seen some knowledgeable people in my own life fall for email-from-your-employer attacks (they clicked the links, but I hope they all stopped short of giving out their passwords). That?s why most businesses will tell you that they will never ask for your password, and authentication texts will usually say something like ?[Company] will never ask you for this code.? Also, you should really stop using two-factor authentication with texts, which are much less secure ? use an authenticator app instead. Google makes a popular one for both iOS and Android. Scammers love to use social media to find victims, too. If you?ve ever so much as tweeted the word ?hack,? you?ll get a series of what I like to call Twitter Scam Reply Guys, who will usually recommend that you contact someone they claim to know who can get your account back, as long as you give them your login credentials and/or pay them (don?t do this).Know where links are taking youA common way people get hacked or scammed is through malicious links, often in their email, texts, or DMs. Always check where a link is taking you before you click on it, and only go to websites you trust. That?s easier said than done, of course; it can be hard to see where a link is directing you on a smaller mobile device, and shortened link services may make it impossible to know where you?ll end up. If you get a text from FedEx about a package delivery with a link, for example, you may not realize that the website it?s sending you to isn?t FedEx.The best thing to do is go to a company?s website directly, rather than through a random link in a text you weren?t expecting in the first place. If you get a text that claims to be FedEx or Wells Fargo, go to FedEx.com or WellsFargo.com; don?t click the link on the text. And definitely don?t enter any of your sensitive information ? like your credit card, social security number, or your password ? on a site if you aren?t absolutely sure that it?s the site you think it is.Be very careful with payment appsOverpayment scams ? when someone sends you more money than you were expecting and then asks you to give them back the difference ? have stood the test of time. Once it was paper checks and wire transfers. Payment apps have made it even easier.In fact, peer-to-peer payment apps like Venmo, Zelle, and Cash App have made a lot of scams easier because it?s fairly seamless to send money through them, and those transfers are instantaneous. There?s a reason why those apps tell you over and over again to be sure that the person you?re sending money to is who you think they are: Once your money is sent, you often can?t get it back. These services don?t have the same protections as, say, a credit card or, in some cases, PayPal. One example of how scammers exploit these apps (and human decency) is to send money to random accounts (like yours), then claim they sent it to the wrong person and ask you to please send the money back. Being nice, you send the money back, only to later discover that the money that was sent to you came from a stolen credit card. Now you have to pay it back ? all of it.If you?re the recipient of extra or unexpected funds, don?t just send the money back to wherever it came from, even if the sender gives you a convincing sob story for why you should. The best thing to do is contact the payment app and deal with the matter through them, rather than directly with whoever sent you the money.There are ways to protect yourself to a certain extent on these apps. Most will give you a way to verify that you?re sending money to the right person by confirming their email address or phone number first. Use these safeguards. Consumer Reports suggests connecting your peer-to-peer payment apps to a credit card instead of a bank account, as credit cards have more protections for fraudulent transactions. If the app won?t protect you, your credit card company might, though most payment apps make you pay a 3 percent fee on credit card transactions.It?s also a good idea to put a PIN code on those apps, so even if someone gets into your phone ? say, if they ask to borrow it to make an emergency call ? they can?t get into your apps and send your money away. This will add an extra step to using your payment app, but an easily remembered four-digit PIN takes about a second to enter and could save you a lot of money. Don?t use cryptoEven in the best of circumstances, crypto is a loosely (or barely) regulated market that?s as volatile as it is hard to understand. That has helped make it a prime target for scammers and hackers. The decentralized aspect of crypto may be part of its appeal, but it?s a lot less appealing when you check your wallet one day and discover all your apes are gone. Maybe you?ll get lucky and OpenSea will freeze trading of your stolen NFT in time, or Coinbase will reimburse you if your crypto was stolen through its own security flaw. But don?t count on it.?The advice I give people is that if you don?t understand how it works, don?t get involved in it,? Sean Gallagher, a senior threat researcher at Sophos, says. ?Considering that many people who consider themselves educated about crypto still manage to get scammed, it?s probably not a good idea for most people to get into cryptocurrency investing.?While crypto is relatively new, many people are getting scammed through some of the oldest tricks in the book. Stokes, of the AARP, says she has seen ?a ton? of scams where someone gains a victim?s trust and claims they can help invest their money in crypto for a big return. The Federal Trade Commission recently reported that consumers lost $1 billion to crypto-based fraud between January 2021 and March 2022, with most of those losses coming from bogus investment scams ? and most of those came from social media posts or ads. And those are just the losses people told the FTC about; again, most people don?t report being defrauded. These days, it?s easy enough to lose money in ?legitimate? crypto investments. Why make it even riskier?Protect yourself from yourselfOne way to avoid getting scammed is to preemptively protect your accounts from your mistakes as much as possible. If Giordano had two-factor authentication on her Instagram account, the scammers wouldn?t have been able to get into it through the URL ? they?d need the code from her authenticator, too. There are a few ways you can protect your accounts from getting hacked, including setting up two-factor authentication and using different passwords for everything via a password manager. You can lock things down even more by using hardware authenticators and anti-malware software, which you can get for mobile devices too.?That?s what security software is supposed to do,? Mark Ostrowski, head of engineering at cybersecurity company Check Point, says. It should protect you from ?a lapse in judgment or if the scam is really, really, really, really good.?At a certain point, your security measures might feel like more trouble than they?re worth. I have to admit, things were easier when I didn?t have to juggle my password manager, two different authenticator apps, and text messages for the accounts where authenticator apps aren?t available. But I?d rather have to take an extra step to log into an account than go through getting hacked and (temporarily) losing $13,000, like I did that time hackers got into my bank account. You never know who has your password or how they got it.?There?s an ongoing usability versus security thing where it?s not fun, it?s time-consuming, it?s annoying,? Grauer, of Consumer Reports, says. It?s up to you to decide where the balance between usability and security should be, keeping in mind what you would lose if someone took over your accounts. After that, all you can do is try to keep these tips in mind, hope for the best, and don?t be too hard on yourself if you fall victim to the worst.?Having a healthy paranoia, I think, is important,? Ostrowski says, before confessing that even he has slipped up and clicked on a few links he shouldn?t have. ?I hate to admit it, but I think everybody has, right??